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English

Use an academic register.referencing should be done according to the harvard style guide.

Use an academic register.Referencing should be done according to the Harvard Style Guide. This includes details on font, spacing, etc. Font: Arial, 11 pt1.5 line spacingJustified alignment

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English

Consider this short response a discussion piece, about 300-500 words analyze a characteristic or some characteristic of the literary period being introduced.this thought piece should be about a paragraph.

Consider this short response a discussion piece, about 300-500 words analyze a characteristic or some characteristic of the literary period being introduced.This thought piece should be about a paragraph.

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English

Essay should be opinion essay and it should not any one feeling while reading them and grammer should be correct and there should be proof on whatever you are writing.

Essay should be opinion essay and it should not any one feeling while reading them and Grammer should be correct and there should be proof on whatever you are writing.

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English

Sources have to be atleast 3 pages or more

Research visual representation of topic
Allow the research the guide the essay
1500 words
MLA Format
Seven credible Sources from within 5 years
Sources have to be atleast 3 pages or more
NO SECOND OR FIRST PERSON
hook and closer

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English

Don’t get caught up in arguing for or against the film’s ideas.

Your task is twofold:
1. You will write your own analysis of the film’s argument and how the appeals
contribute to its construction,
2. AND you will also analyze how two published reviews represent the film.
Although you must be knowledgeable about the film, your essay should balance
your interpretation and analysis with the media sources’ depiction of the film, its
themes and artistic techniques. Locate two reviews of the film you’ve selected.
Pick from reputable film review online sources, articles from newspapers or
magazines, etc. Avoid personal/blog reviews. Your essay will be more
interesting if you seek sources that take varied, perhaps even extreme, stances. In
other words, don’t just use the first sources you find if they all take similar
positions. In this essay, you will also argue which of the sources you’ve
selected most effectively and convincingly argues its points. Of course, you
must support your position. You do not have to agree with the author’s biases or
even to like the article in question to argue that it succeeds as a piece of rhetoric.
Remember to analyze both the film and the articles. Don’t get caught up in arguing for
or against the film’s ideas. Even as you argue (in third person) which author creates the
strongest argument, you are not making a personal statement, but a claim based upon
evidence from the text. You may need to use the rhetorical modes such as definition,
compare/contrast, classification/division, cause/effect, exemplification and illustration to
make your points clear. This is not a film summary, but an analysis. Make sure to
address the presence of pathos, ethos and logos in the film and in the reviews.
Format:
Create a Works Cited page with at least 3-4 entries (including primary sources like the
film itself) and secondary sources (like the reviews). Do not include tertiary sources
(like encyclopedias). This must be in alphabetical order and in correct MLA format.
MLA Guidelines: typed formal paper with works cited page, double spaced, 1″ margins
4-5 pages
https://www.shortoftheweek.com/2016/08/05/nzingha/

Categories
English

Perhaps a parent, a teacher, or a friend.

Think of someone from your childhood that had an influence over your life. This could be a positive or negative influence. Perhaps a parent, a teacher, or a friend. Write a narrative story about that person and their influence. You may write from first person perspective (use I and reflect on your personal experience) or you can write from the other person’s point of view (as if you were them). Be creative, and try get immerse your reader in the story. Please write a minimum of two pages in MLA format (times new roman, size 12 font, double spaced).

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English

Face complexity

WHITE PAPER DESCRIPTION (5 POINTS)
Using these same sources, you will write a white paper
The white paper describes and quantifies an actual problem in light of the needs of the chosen
funding sources. It collates and organizes information to test the viability of the topic. The
problem identified may need framing and narrowing and be supported by fieldwork . The White
paper….
Identify with people and points to a patron
Point to a documented problem
Face complexity
Suggests lines of research
Position the work within a paradigm
Demonstrate originality
Stays within reach
Address all six p’s to some degree
Include headings to help guide the reader
Include a list of references and uses in-text quotes
Is written in 1single space, 12 font size with one-inch margins on all 4 sides
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY DESCRIPTION ( 5 POINTS)
Your submission should annotate at least six sources you have located through your independent
research that should be scholarly such as found in journals and books. Each source should be
listed in the appropriate citation style in double space and be followed with at least 100 -150
words of your independent and original assessment of the source and its value to your research
project as single-spaced annotations. You may want to have a range of sources that address the
problem, public and paradigm-theory and model of success

Categories
English

Present the analysis in a logical,

REQUIREMENTS
Prepare the following sections of your research report:
1. Research report introduction: provide a clear introduction of your research project as well as a justification for choosing the research topic. Include a list of important terms with definitions
where appropriate.
2. Research objectives / questions: outline the research objectives / questions for your research
project .
3. Literature review. Your literature review should:
• Have a brief introduction that clearly states the purpose of the review and the
significance of this to this research project. An overview of the type of literature that appears in your literature review.
• Include situational / industrial factors that provide a background to the research where this is relevant e.g. you may need to provide a history of a topic or legal influences or
specific industry conditions and practices.
• Demonstrate an awareness of related literature in this field and provide an overview
of the key debates, theories and concepts that are relevant to your field of study.
• Cover information sources that are reputable and of a high quality.
• Evaluates the relevance of the chosen literature to your research project.
4. A planned timeline for the remainder of the research project. This timeline should have specific
goals, objectives and dates these are to be completed.
N.B. when you analyse your primary research data you may find that there are unanticipated new
concepts/ theories relevant to your topic that you need to add to your literature review. It is fine for you
to add this to the literature review that appears in your final report.
Generally, your report will contain ten sections when it is based on primary research.
1 Title:
Choose your title carefully; making sure it reflects the content of your report. Sometimes it can
be easier to choose your title last.
2 Abstract:
An abstract is a summary of the entire report and includes the report’s aims and objectives,
main findings and key recommendations. Normally it would take up about a page in length
(max 200 words in this case). An abstract is not the same as an introduction (see introduction
section). The purpose of the abstract is to allow anyone reading your report to gain a quick
overview.
3 Introduction:
In the section you introduce your report topic and context. Include such things as an explanation
of the topic area, the problem or issues being reported, the specific research objectives, the
question addressed in the report, the limitations and assumptions and importantly you preview
the report structure.
4 Literature Review:
A summary-review of all the literature sources you have consulted during the researching and
writing-up of your report. Conducting a literature review is the first step in your project once you
have identified your topic area. Your conclusion for your literature review should summarise all
your main findings and you should link this into your analysis and interpretation chapter and
recommendations where applicable.
5 Methodology:
In this section, give a precise description of the method employed in carrying out your
investigation. You might, for instance, include several sub-sections covering data collection,
sampling, questionnaire development, survey procedure, etc. The main aims of this section are
two-fold: (a) it allows the critical reader to assess the quality of your method in relation to both
professional practice and the study’s objectives; and (b) subsequent researchers will be able to
understand exactly how and why you set up the study in the way that you did – this is of immense
importance if they wish to replicate your work.
It is recognised that some topics are better suited to a higher emphasis placed on secondary
research as compared to primary research. You should discuss and justify this in this section if
this is the case with your project.
6 Findings:
Naturally it is imperative that you present your findings in the most appropriate way. There is
no “one right way” to report your findings – individual reports will vary so much. In general, the
findings outline the work you have done to enable you to undertake analysis and interpretation.
You must use credible sources and clear evidence which helps you make your case. You need
to present your information in a logical, systematic manner and divide the material with
appropriate headings to help the reader’s understanding.
7 Analysis and Interpretation of Findings/Discussion:
In this section, you analyse and interpret your findings and ‘present your stance/paradigm’. This
will lead into your conclusions and recommendations. Present the analysis in a logical,
systematic way and divide the material with appropriate headings to assist the reader’s
understanding.
N.B. It is recommended that you combine your findings and analysis.
8 Conclusions
The conclusions section summarises the key findings of the report and must be grounded in the
present, (in contrast to the recommendations which focus towards the future). Conclusions
should be presented as a list of points arranged so the major conclusions come first.
9 Recommendations:
The recommendations section includes the opinions of the writer about the course of action that
should be followed. Recommendations focus towards the future (in contrast to the conclusions
which are grounded in the present). Recommendations should be action-oriented, numbered,
arranged in order of importance and not contain any new information. You should refer to your
main research issue and the objectives that you set out to investigate. This will show the
examiner that you have used your research to formulate the recommendations for your
management issue
References:
Note: A reference list contains only the material you have cited in your report
If you have used other material (such as background reading) but have not cited this information
anywhere in your report then this should be listed separately under a new list called
“Bibliography”.
11 Appendices:
Material that is complex and/or detailed is collected at the end of the report in the Appendices
so as not to distract readers from the main theme. Include pictures, graphs and other
illustrations in the appendices. You should label these “Appendix 1”, “Appendix 2”, etc. and
refer the reader to the appropriate appendix, where necessary, in the main body of your report.
This is a good start and attempt. Assuming this is the introduction phase. But once you dive into these section later, consider the following tips:
In your literature review, write definitions with in-text citations: wellbeing, employee wellbeing, human resources, productivity, effectiveness and efficiency in the workplace. You may also write best practices from textbooks on these specific terms; that way, you educate the reader/stakeholder and demonstrate academic rigour. You may then proceed to write about the industry trends of what other organisations are doing in their HR function to promote employee wellbeing and its effectiveness on productivity; these can be sourced from journals.
The same applies to methodology; you need to define any research-based term, such as ‘research’, research process, methodology, primary data, secondary data, data analysis, research design, quantitative and qualitative. When you need to use or apply a research method, try and define it with an in-text citation.

Categories
English

Open with quotation, statistic, or anecdote.

Outline for Essay #1: Follow This Outline I. Introduction A. Open with quotation, statistic, or anecdote. B. State Thesis: Topic + Your Point of View (containing issues #1, #2 & #3 for which you will argue). [Smooth, logical transition sentence] II. Refutation of the Opposition A. Define, clarify, or explain issue #1 your opponents’ support. B. Define, clarify, or explain issue #2 your opponents’ support. [Smooth, logical transition sentence] III. Your Argument for Issue #1 A. Include a specific example, fact and/or quotation of how or why opponents are wrong. B. Include a specific example, fact and/or quotation of how or why opponents are wrong. [Smooth, logical transition sentence] IV. Your Argument for Issue #2 A. Include a specific example, fact and/or quotation of how or why opponents are wrong. B. Include a specific example, fact and/or quotation of how or why opponents are wrong. [Smooth, logical transition sentence] V. Your Argument for Issue #3 A. Include a specific example, fact and/or quotation of how or why opponents are wrong. B. Include a specific example, fact and/or quotation of how or why opponents are wrong. [Smooth, logical transition sentence] VI. Conclusion A. Return to your thesis and reinforce it (do not simply restate it; say it in different words). B. Close with a memorable quotation, anecdote, or an appeal to your audience’s sense of justice and fairness. *Works Cited Page

Categories
English

Each annotation should include: an mla formatted citation

Create an MLA formatted Annotated Bibliography that lists and annotates at least FIVE independently researched scholarly and/or critical articles on the topic you have chosen to write about. Credible sources may include scholarly articles, newspaper articles/ editorials, news organizations such as NPR or CNN, reliable websites like .gov or .edu.
Develop a tentative thesis statement. Write your thesis above your annotations.
Create an annotation for each of your sources. Each annotation should include:
an MLA formatted citation
a summary of the source in your own wording and style (about 100 words)
an evaluation of the credibility of the sources and how the source supports your argument and will fit in your essay (at least 50 words)
Put all the annotations in ONE document and format your document in MLA style. Remember to list sources in alphabetical order according to the first word of each source citation.